Illinois parents often struggle to strike a balance after a divorce. It is hard to co-parent your child with someone you likely are not on the best of terms with. However, many parents in your situation come up with a livable arrangement that works for all parties.

Unfortunately, this is not the case for everyone. Sometimes, an ex-spouse may be spiteful enough to try turning your child against you. This is parental alienation.

How parental alienation impacts your child

The Psychiatric Times looks at parental alienation and the damage it causes. It harms not only the alienated parent – you, in this case – but also hurts your child. This is because parental alienation is a form of child psychological abuse. Your child suffers from manipulative tactics used by a trusted figure in a position of power over them. This often leads to trust issues later in life.

Many children who suffer from parental alienation struggle to make connections with peers. They may have trouble finding successful relationships because of these trust issues. Many also suffer from depression or anxiety and may cope via substance abuse because of this.

Struggling with parental alienation

Of course, the alienated parent also suffers in this scenario. To you, it is often like the premature death of a child. If your child grows so alienated that they no longer want anything to do with you, then you no longer have their presence in your life. This can feel just as traumatizing as any other significant loss.

If you notice signs of parental alienation in earlier stages, it may not be too late to act. In taking quick action, you may be able to stop permanent damage from happening.